Karissa’s Fingerless Gloves – free pattern

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Last Saturday, I had an idea for a new design: gloves that would leave the very tips of the fingers open for use on touchscreen devices. Crocheting several narrow tubes for the fingers seemed complicated, so I looked for another solution.

I had an idea for a spiral design with openings at different finger heights. The concept wasn’t quite clear in my head, so I decided to test it with some scrap yarn. Since I didn’t want to spend a lot of time on the cuff when I just wanted to check the finger design, I started from just below the thumb.

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Christmas Crescent

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November is almost over, and Christmas is approaching quickly. It’s time to start making presents!

The first gift I’ve finished so far is my first shawl project. I used one skein of Simply Soft Light in Hawaiian Sky to make Julie Aakjær’s beautiful Spring Crescent pattern, which is available as a free download on Ravelry, here.

I would definitely use both the yarn and the pattern again. The Simply Soft Light has great yardage for the price, is machine washable, and is available in several jewel-tone colors. Even after heavy frogging, the yarn hardly pills at all, although it sticks to itself in some places. The light twist of the yarn lends texture to the finished fabric and adds interest to the project. The Spring Crescent pattern has clear instructions and simple charts. It’s easy to modify to accommodate for different amounts and weights of yarn. This simple one-skein shawl will make a great gift.

 

My First Socks

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Fall is finally here, and the nights have been getting more and more chilly. My feet are always freezing!

A few weeks ago, I decided to crochet myself some wool socks. I browsed Ravelry for simple sock patterns and found Julie Willis’ free photo tutorial for Step-by-Step Socks. Then, I bought myself a ball of Serenity Sock Weight yarn.

These socks were quick and easy to make, and the pictures made the pattern extremely easy to follow. The best thing about the pattern is that it gives instructions for customizing the socks to fit your feet perfectly. Another great thing about this pattern is that it takes only one ball of yarn to make a pair of ankle-high socks.

I love my first homemade socks. I put them on the minute I finished them, not even waiting to sew in the ends. (I waited until it was warm enough to take them off.) They have already been through the wash twice, and they still look just as good as when I finished them. I will definitely use both the pattern and the yarn again.

Blaze Peplum Shirt Release

My very first published pattern, the Blaze Peplum Top, has completed testing! It’s free for the first 150 downloads on Ravelry with the coupon code BLAZEFREE. After this promotion, the price will go to $4.00.

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Details:

This crochet toddler shirt pattern is formed in two parts: a top made of join-as-you-go motifs and a peplum of lacy shells. It works up quickly with 450 yards of DK yarn and a size J-10 (6.00 mm) crochet hook.

Additional Materials Needed:

Scissors
Yarn needle

Gauge:
Pentagon motif – 3” diameter
Hexagon motif – 4” diameter
Skirt – 2 repeats in pattern = 3”

Baby Blaze Peplum Shirt (Crochet Pattern)

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I have recently become hooked on the designs of Doris Chan. I love her crochet philosophy: no seam, join-as-you-go, and yarn-efficient. After making a few designs from her book Convertible Crochet, I was inspired to design a motif-based shirt for my little sister Emma. In a few days, I designed and completed the Blaze Peplum Shirt. The project was yarn efficient, quick to make, and very rewarding, so I decided to share it.

The pattern for the Blaze Peplum shirt (size: 12-months) is now selling on Ravelry and Craftsy.

Don’t have an account on Ravelry or Craftsy? Click here: